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Black Creek

DEATH CAFÉ

talking about death won't kill you.

The Death Café is a gathering of people in an informal + relaxed atmosphere, talking about experiences, fears and thoughts about the inevitable. The objective is to increase awareness of death with a view to helping people make the most of their (finite) lives. 

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ABOUT
DEATH CAFÉ

A Death Café is not a physical location, but is an event hosted at a public location or other pop-up/ temporary venue. 

Death Café is a frank, unscripted, non-directed discussion about the subject of dying and death conducted at a safe location, such as a community centre, coffee shop, and yes, even a fire hall. 

 

There is no standard or official format, but generally, a Death Café event lasts between 90-120 minutes, is free to the public, and provides coffee + tea, soft drinks, and light snacks for participants.

About

Time + Date

Thursday May 5th 2022
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Location

Oyster River Fire Hall
2241 Catherwood Rd
Black Creek, BC

RSVP

Update: The May 5th event is now at capacity. Join the waitlist to hold a spot for the our next event. And we'll notify you as soon as we iron out the details. 
Upcoming Events

DEATH CAFÉ
CORE PRINCIPLES

With no intention of leading participants to any conclusion, product or course of action. 

As an open, respectful and confidential space where people can express their views safely. 

In an accessible, respectful and confidential space

On a not for profit basis. 

Alongside refreshing drinks and nourishing food. 

Core Principles
Cafe Hosts
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Hosted by
Megan Lane + Chris Chambers

Megan and Chris live in Black Creek with their two dogs and three cats. Together they co-own a marine repair shop in Campbell River. 

 

Outside of work,  Chris is passionate about his role at the Oyster River Fire Department and Megan is a lifelong student. Most recently, Megan’s constant quest for knowledge brought her to an End of Life Doula course with Douglas College, which is where she first heard of Death Cafés. 

 

A few Sundays ago, Megan half-jokingly asked Chris if he’d host a Death Café with her and much to her surprise, he immediately agreed.

 

Et voila, we are hosting our first ever Death Café!

As of today, there have been 13,956 Death Cafés held in over 81 countries (since 2011).

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  • What is a Death Café?
    The Death Café is a gathering of people in an informal and relaxed atmosphere, talking about experiences, fears, and thoughts about the inevitable. The objective is to increase awareness of death to help people make the most of their (finite) lives. There is no standard or official format, but generally, a Death Café event lasts between 90-120 minutes, is free to the public, and provides coffee + tea, soft drinks, and light snacks for participants.
  • What to expect?
    Death Café is a frank, unscripted, non-directed discussion about the subject of dying and death conducted at a safe location, such as a community center, church, coffee shop, or yes, even a fire hall. A Death Café event typically starts with a facilitator welcoming attendees, explaining how the meeting will progress, and then offering an initial “icebreaker” for participants to discuss. Next, the conversation is turned over to the participants, which is when things become truly interesting. The conversation at this point usually follows a free-form, self-directed arrangement. There is no attempt to direct the discussion toward a particular outcome during a death cafe. Moreover, while the participants come from all walks of life, those attending the event usually understand that a Death Café is a place where participants can express personal opinions about dying and death freely, confidentially, and without fear of ridicule or recrimination.
  • Who is invited/should attend?
    Our Death Café is free and open to anyone, to speak freely and without judgment. We encourage folks from all walks of life. Due to limited capacity RSVP via the website is required and you will be sent a confirmation by email. Please note that a Death Café is not a bereavement support or grief counseling setting. The Death Café does not work for people who, for whatever reason, aren’t able to discuss death comfortably and openly. If you are seeking bereavement support or grief counseling, I encourage you to call the BC Bereavement Helpline. The service is free, confidential, and anonymous. They will help you find the most appropriate support for your specific type of loss. The BC Helpline is available Monday to Friday 9 AM - 5 PM PST and can be reached at 1 877 779 2223 contact@bcbh.ca
  • Who is your host?
    Megan Lane and Chris Chambers live in Black Creek with their two dogs and three cats. Together they co-own a marine repair shop in Campbell River. Outside of work, Chris is passionate about his role at the Oyster River Fire Department and Megan is a lifelong student. Megan’s constant quest for knowledge brought her to an End of Life Doula course at the start of this year, which is where she first heard of Death Cafés. One day, Megan half-jokingly asked Chris if he’d host a Death Café with her and much to her surprise, he immediately agreed.
  • Why host a Death Café?
    Dying is something we will universally experience, something that unites us all. People naturally want to talk about death and dying. However, our culture has made it taboo to openly discuss end-of-life. It’s often very private conversations that are only with doctors, lawyers, and funeral directors. As mentioned above, Megan recently took an End of Life Doula course and she hasn’t stopped talking about death since. Together with her husband Chris, they have had some fantastic conversations with friends and family about death and dying. These conversations have left them feeling more connected to their family and friends as well as more grateful for their finite lives. We want to encourage open, honest, and healthy dialogue surrounding death and dying. We want to bring the conversations back into the community, ultimately creating a more Death Positive culture.
  • What does Death Positive mean?
    People who are Death Positive believe that it is not morbid or taboo to speak openly about death. Engaging with our inevitable death is not unhealthy, but rather displays a natural curiosity about the human condition. They see honest conversations about death and dying as the cornerstone of a healthy society.
  • What’s the history behind Death Cafés?
    The idea originates with the Swiss sociologist and anthropologist Dr. Bernard Crettaz, who organized the first café mortel in 2004. Jon Underwood, a UK web developer was inspired by Crettaz's work and developed the Death Café model in 2011. As he saw it, western society has long outsourced discussions about death to doctors, priests and funeral directors. The result, says Underwood, is that we have lost control of one of the most significant events we ever have to face. He created the Death Café a scheduled non-profit get-together for the purpose of talking about death over food and drink, usually tea and cake. As of today, there have been 13,956 Death Cafés held in over 81 countries (since 2011).
FAQ
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It’s also worth stating here 
WHAT DEATH CAFES ARE NOT

Death Cafe is not a bereavement support or grief counselling setting. Death Cafe doesn't work for people who, for whatever reason, aren’t able to discuss death comfortably and openly. 

Death Cafes aren’t an opportunity to give people information about death and dying - regardless of how good or important it is. Rather we create time to discuss death without expectations. 

Death Cafes don’t have specific topics, set questions or guest speakers. Our views are that, when it comes to death, people have enough to discuss already. 

We are all just walking each other home. 

- Ram Dass

Reserve Your Seat
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I want a seat at the table, add me to the waitlist!

thanks! we'll send you an email confirming your seat!

Land Acknowledgement

We would like to respectfully acknowledge that we live, work + play  on the traditional and unceded territory of the Coast Salish, K’ómoks, We Wai Kum, We Wai Kai + Homalco First Nations. ​

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